State Law > Oregon > Oregon Family and Medical Leave Law

Oregon Family and Medical Leave Law

 

Oregon Family and Medical Leave Law

The state of Oregon's law regarding family and medical leave can be found in Title 51, Chapter 659 of the Oregon Revised Statutes. The state also has a law requiring employers to grant leave to bone marrow donors in Oregon's Revised Statutes Title 51, Chapter 659. Although not required by law, Oregon encourages leave for school visitation in Title 30, Chapter 329 of the Oregon's Revised Statutes. Oregon also has a law concerning breastfeeding as discussed below.

Oregon Family Leave Act

  • 839-009-0210 Definitions.
  • 839-009-0220 Relationship of OFLA to FMLA
  • 839-009-0230 Purposes for Taking OFLA Leave
  • 839-009-0240 Length of Leave and Other Conditions
  • 839-009-0245 Intermittent Leave and Alternate Duty
  • 839-009-0250 Notice by Employee; Designation by Employer
  • 839-009-0260 Medical Verification and Scheduling of Treatment
  • 839-009-0270 Job Protection
  • 839-009-0280 Use of Paid Leave
  • 839-009-0290 Special Rules for Public School Teachers
  • 839-009-0320 Enforcement and Retaliation
  • 659A.150 Definitions for ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186.
  • 659A.153 Covered employers.
  • 659A.156 Eligible employees; exceptions.
  • 659A.159 Purposes for which family leave may be taken.
  • 659A.165 Notice to employer.
  • 659A.168 Medical verification and scheduling of treatment.
  • 659A.171 Job protection; benefits.
  • 659A.174 Use of paid leave.
  • 659A.177 Special rules for teachers.
  • 659A.180 Postings by employer.
  • 659A.186 Exclusivity of provisions; construction.

School Visitation

  • 329.125 Policy on parental and community participation.

Bone Marrow Donation

  • 59A.312 Leave of absence to donate bone marrow; verification by employer.

Breastfeeding

  • 109.001. Right to breastfeed.

Oregon Family Leave Act Rules

839-009-0200 Purpose and Scope

(1) The Civil Rights Division of the Bureau of Labor and Industries enforces the Oregon Family Leave Act (OFLA), ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186, which provides for OFLA leave and prohibits discrimination against employees using OFLA leave. These rules implement and interpret the Oregon Family Leave Act.

(2) These rules apply to complaints and inquiries received under ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186 and under these rules.

839-009-0210 Definitions

(1) "Alternate duty" means work assigned to an employee that may consist of:

(a) The employee's same duties worked on a different schedule; or

(b) Different duties worked on the same or different schedule.

(2) "Child," for the purposes of parental and sick child leave only (not for the purposes of serious health condition leave), means a biological, adopted, foster or stepchild, the child of an employee's same-gender domestic partner or a child with whom the employee is or was in a relationship of in loco parentis. The child must be:

(a) Under the age of 18; or

(b) An adult dependent child substantially limited by a physical or mental impairment as defined by ORS 659A.100(2)(d).

(3) "Covered employer" means any employer employing 25 or more persons in the State of Oregon for each working day during each of 20 or more calendar work weeks in the calendar year in which the leave is to be taken or in the calendar year immediately preceding the year in which the leave is to be taken.

(4) "Domestic partner" means an individual joined in a domestic partnership.

(5) "Domestic partnership" for the purposes of ORS Chapter 659A means two individuals of the same sex who have received a Certificate of Registered Domestic Partnership from the State of Oregon in compliance with ORS 432.405(1) and rules adopted by the State Registrar of the Center for Health Statistics.

(6) "Eligible employee" means an employee employed in the State of Oregon on the date OFLA leave begins. For eligibility of employees reemployed following a period of uniformed service, see subsections (c) and (d) of this section.

(a) For the purpose of taking parental leave, an employee must be employed by a covered employer for at least 180 calendar days immediately preceding the date on which OFLA leave begins.

(b) For purposes of taking all other types of OFLA leave, including pregnancy disability leave, an employee must have worked for a covered employer for an average of at least 25 hours per week during the 180 calendar days immediately preceding the date OFLA leave begins.

(A) In determining that an employee has been employed for the preceding 180 calendar days, the employer must count the number of days an employee is maintained on the payroll, including all time paid or unpaid. If an employee continues to be employed by a successor in interest to the original employer, the number of days worked are counted as continuous employment by a single employer.

(B) In determining 25 hours average per week, the employer must count actual hours worked using guidelines set out pursuant to the Fair Labor Standards Act (See 29 CFR Part 785).

(c) The federal Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Act, 38 USC 43 (USERRA) provides that an employee reemployed following a period of uniformed service is entitled to the seniority and seniority-based rights and benefits that the employee had on the date the uniformed service began, plus any seniority and seniority-based rights and benefits that the employee would have attained if the employee had remained continuously employed. Federal Department of Labor regulation 20 CFR 1002.210 provides that in determining entitlement to seniority and seniority-based rights and benefits, the period of absence from employment due to or necessitated by uniformed service is not considered a break in employment. The rights and benefits protected by USERRA upon reemployment include those provided by the employer and those required by statute. Under USERRA, a reemployed service member would be eligible for leave under OFLA if the number of days and the number of hours of work for which the service member was employed by the civilian employer, together with the number of days and number of hours of work for which the service member would have been employed by the civilian employer during the period of uniformed service, meet OFLA's eligibility requirements. In the event that a service member is denied OFLA leave for failing to satisfy the OFLA days and hours of work requirement due to absence from employment necessitated by uniformed service, the service member may have a cause of action under USERRA but not under OFLA. [Note: USERRA also applies to leave under the federal Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, 29 USC 2601-2654 (FMLA).]

(d) ORS 659A.082 -- 659A.088 provides that an employee reemployed following a period of uniformed service is entitled to the seniority and seniority-based rights and benefits that the employee had on the date the uniformed service began, plus any seniority and seniority-based rights and benefits that the employee would have attained if the employee had remained continuously employed. In determining entitlement to seniority and seniority-based rights and benefits, the period of absence from employment due to or necessitated by uniformed service is not considered a break in employment. If a reemployed service member was eligible for leave under OFLA prior to the date uniformed service began, OFLA's eligibility requirements are considered met.

(e) For the purpose of qualifying as an eligible employee, the employee need not work solely in the State of Oregon.

(7) "Family member" means the spouse, same-gender domestic partner, custodial parent, non-custodial parent, adoptive parent, foster parent, biological parent, parent-in-law, parent of same-gender domestic partner, grandparent or grandchild of the employee, or a person with whom the employee is or was in a relationship of in loco parentis. It also includes the biological, adopted, foster or stepchild of an employee or the child of an employee's same-gender domestic partner. For the purposes of OFLA, an employee's child in any of these categories may be either a minor or an adult at the time serious health condition leave is taken.

(8) "FMLA" is the federal Family and Medical Leave Act, 29 USC 2601.

(9) “Foreseeable leave” means leave taken for a purpose set out in ORS 659A.159 that is not “unforeseeable leave” as defined in OAR 839-009-0210(21).

(10) "Foster child" means a child, not adopted, but being reared as a result of legal process, by a person other than the child's natural parent.

(11) "Gender" means an individual's assigned sex at birth, gender identity, or gender expression.

(12) "Gender expression" means the manner in which an individual's gender identity is expressed, including, but not limited to, through dress, appearance, manner, speech, or lifestyle, whether or not that expression is different from that traditionally associated with the individual's assigned sex at birth.

(13) "Gender identity" means an individual's gender-related identity, whether or not that identity is different from that traditionally associated with the individual's assigned sex at birth, including, but not limited to, a gender identity that is transgender or androgynous.

(14) "Health care provider" means:

(a) The person primarily responsible for providing health care to an eligible employee or to a family member of an eligible employee: and

(b) Who is a physician licensed to practice medicine or surgery, including a doctor of osteopathy; or

(c) A podiatrist, a dentist, a clinical psychologist, an optometrist, a naturopath, a nurse practitioner, a licensed physician's assistant, a direct entry midwife, a nurse-midwife or a clinical social worker authorized to practice and perform within the scope of a professional license as provided by law; or

(d) A Christian Science practitioner listed with the First Church of Christ Scientist in Boston, Mass: or

(e) A chiropractor, but only to the extent that a chiropractor provides treatment consisting of manual manipulation of the spine to correct a subluxation demonstrated to exist by X-rays.

(15) "In loco parentis" means in the place of a parent, having financial and day-to-day responsibility for the care of a child. A legal or biological relationship is not required.

(16) "Intermittent leave" means leave taken in multiple blocks of time and/or requiring an altered or reduced work schedule.

(17) "OFLA" is the Oregon Family Leave Act, ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186.

(18) "OFLA leave" means a leave of absence for purposes described in ORS 659A.159 and OAR 839-009-0230(1) through (4). Except that "OFLA leave" does not include leave taken by an eligible employee who is unable to work because of a disabling compensable injury, as defined in ORS 656.005, unless the employee has refused a suitable offer of light duty or modified employment under ORS 659A.043(3)(a)(D) or 659A.046(3)(d). See ORS 659A.162, OAR 839-006-0131(2) and 839-006-0136(4).

(19) "OFLA leave year," for calculating the OFLA leave year entitlement, means a calendar year (January to December), a fixed 12-month period such as a fiscal year, a 12-month period measured forward from the date of the employee's first OFLA leave, or a 12-month period measured backward from the date the employee uses any OFLA leave. The option selected must be applied to all employees. In the absence of an employer policy or collective bargaining agreement defining how an OFLA leave year will be measured, a calendar year will be used.

(20) "Serious health condition" means an illness, injury, impairment or physical or mental condition of an employee or family member:

(a) That requires inpatient care in a medical care facility such as a hospital, hospice or residential facility such as a nursing home. When a family member resides in a long-term residential care facility, leave applies only to:

(A) Transition periods spent moving the family member from one home or facility to another, including time to make arrangements for such transitions;

(B) Transportation or other assistance required for a family member to obtain care from a physician; or

(C) Serious health conditions as described in (b) through (h) of section (19) of this rule.

(b) That the treating health care provider judges to pose an imminent danger of death, or that is terminal in prognosis with a reasonable possibility of death in the near future;

(c) That requires constant or continuing care such as home care administered by a health care professional;

(d) That involves a period of incapacity. Incapacity is the inability to perform at least one essential job function, or to attend school or perform regular daily activities for more than three consecutive calendar days and any subsequent required treatment or recovery period relating to the same condition. This incapacity must involve:

(A) Two or more treatments by a health care provider; or

(B) One treatment plus a regimen of continuing care.

(e) That results in a period of incapacity or treatment for a chronic serious health condition that requires periodic visits for treatment by a health care provider, continues over an extended period of time, and may cause episodic rather than a continuing period of incapacity, such as asthma, diabetes or epilepsy;

(f) That involves permanent or long-term incapacity due to a condition for which treatment may not be effective, such as Alzheimer's disease, a severe stroke or terminal stages of a disease. The employee or family member must be under the continuing care of a health care provider, but need not be receiving active treatment;

(g) That involves multiple treatments for restorative surgery or for a condition such as chemotherapy for cancer, physical therapy for arthritis, or dialysis for kidney disease that if not treated would likely result in incapacity of more than three days; or

(h) That involves any period of disability of a female due to pregnancy or childbirth or period of absence for prenatal care.

(21) “Unforeseeable leave” means leave taken as a result of:

(a) An unexpected serious health condition of an employee or family member of an employee; or

(b) An unexpected illness, injury or condition of a child of the employee that requires home care; or

(c) A premature birth or a placement for adoption or foster care the exact date of which cannot be previously determined with certainty.

839-009-0220 Relationship of OFLA to FMLA

(1) Leave taken under FMLA counts as OFLA leave provided the employee is also eligible for OFLA leave.

(2) Provisions of OFLA will be construed to the extent possible in a manner that is consistent with any similar provisions of FMLA; however, employers subject to both OFLA and FMLA must apply the provision that is more beneficial to the employee’s circumstances.

839-009-0230 Purposes for Taking OFLA Leave

Eligible employees may take OFLA leave for the purposes commonly referred to as parental leave, serious health condition leave, pregnancy disability leave and sick child leave.

(1) Parental leave is leave taken to care for the employee's newborn, newly adopted or newly placed foster child under 18 years of age or for a newly adopted or newly placed foster child 18 years of age or older who is incapable of self care because of a physical or mental impairment. It includes leave time to effectuate the legal process required for placement of a foster child or the adoption of a child.

(2) Serious health condition leave is leave taken:

(a) To provide care for a family member with a serious health condition as defined in 839-009-0210(19); or

(b) To recover from or seek treatment for a serious health condition that renders an employee unable to perform at least one essential function of the employee's regular position.

(3) Pregnancy disability leave is leave taken by a female employee for a disability related to pregnancy or childbirth, occurring before or after the birth of the child, or for prenatal care. Pregnancy disability leave is a form of serious health condition leave.

(4) Sick child leave is leave taken to care for an employee's child suffering from an illness or injury that requires home care but is not a serious health condition. An employer is not required to grant leave for routine medical or dental appointments.

839-009-0240 Length of Leave and Other Conditions

(1) An eligible employee is entitled to as much as 12 weeks of OFLA leave in any one-year period except that:

(a) An eligible female employee may take up to 12 weeks of pregnancy disability leave in addition to 12 weeks of OFLA leave for any leave purpose;

(b) An eligible employee taking the entire 12 weeks of OFLA leave for parental leave may take an additional 12 weeks of sick child leave within the same leave year. If the employee uses less than 12 weeks of parental leave, however, no additional sick child leave is available, except for the balance of the initial 12 weeks. The employee may also use this balance for any other OFLA leave purpose.

(2) An eligible female employee may take up to 36 weeks of OFLA leave in one leave year that includes up to 12 weeks of pregnancy disability leave, followed by 12 weeks of parental leave, and 12 weeks of sick child leave.

(3) An eligible employee may take up to 24 weeks of OFLA leave in one leave year under the following circumstances:

(a) The employee takes 12 weeks of parental leave, followed by:

(b) Twelve weeks of sick child leave.

(4) When two eligible family members work for the same covered employer, both employees may take OFLA leave at the same time only under the following circumstances:

(a) One employee needs to care for the other employee suffering from a serious health condition; or

(b) One employee needs to care for a child suffering from a serious health condition while the other employee is also suffering from a serious health condition; or

(c) Both family members are suffering from a serious health condition; or

(d) The employer allows concurrent leave.

(5) Unless the employer approves otherwise, parental leave must be taken in one uninterrupted period, and must be completed within 12 months of the birth, adoption or placement of the child. An exception must be made to allow parental leave to effectuate adoption or foster placement of the child. Such leave need not be taken in one, uninterrupted period with any additional parental leave.

(6) The birth, adoption or foster placement of multiple children at one time entitles the employee to take only one 12-week period of parental leave.

(7) Sick child leave need not be provided to an eligible employee by a covered employer if another family member, including a non-custodial biological parent, is willing and able to care for the child.

(8) A covered employer may not reduce the amount of OFLA leave available to an eligible employee under this section by any period the employee is unable to work because of a disabling compensable injury as defined in ORS 656.005.

(a) If an employee uses OFLA leave for a workplace injury pending acceptance of a workers' compensation claim, upon acceptance of the claim any OFLA leave used for the workplace injury must be restored to the employee. If the claim is denied, OFLA leave will be deducted from the employee's entitlement.

(A) If the employer uses a rolling forward leave year, a fixed leave year or a calendar leave year, and a worker's compensation claim is first denied and then accepted, the employer must restore any OFLA leave taken in the leave year in which the worker's compensation claim is accepted.

(b) An employee must be eligible under OAR 839-009-0210(6) in order to use OFLA leave following a period the employee is unable to work because of a disabling compensable injury as defined in ORS 656.005.

(9) Notwithstanding section (8) of this rule, the employer may reduce the amount of OFLA leave available to an eligible employee under this section by any period the employee is unable to work because of a disabling compensable injury as defined in ORS 656.005 after the employee has refused a suitable offer of light duty or modified employment under ORS 659A.043(3)(a)(D) or 659A.046(3)(d). See ORS 659A.043(4), 659A.046(5), 659A.162, OAR 839-006-0131(2) and 839-006-0136(4).

(10) For the purpose of intermittent leave, OFLA leave entitlement is calculated for an employee by multiplying the number of hours the employee normally works per week by 12. (For example, an employee normally employed to work 30 hours per week is entitled to 12 times 30 hours, or a total of 360 hours OFLA leave.)

(a) If an employee's schedule varies from week to week, a weekly average of the hours worked over the 12 months worked prior to the beginning of the leave period must be used for calculating the employee's normal work week. (For example, an employee working an average of 25 hours per week is entitled to 12 times 25 hours, or a total of 300 hours OFLA leave.)

(b) If an employee takes intermittent or reduced work schedule OFLA leave, only the actual number of hours of leave taken may be counted toward the 12 weeks of OFLA leave to which the employee is entitled.

(11) An employee who has previously qualified for and taken some portion of OFLA leave must requalify as an "eligible employee" as defined in OAR 839-009-0210(6) each time the employee begins additional OFLA leave within the same leave year. Exceptions:

(a) An employee who has been granted OFLA leave for a qualifying serious health condition of the employee or family member need not requalify under OAR 839-009-0210(6) each time leave for the same purpose (the same individual and the same serious health condition) is taken.

(b) A female employee who has been granted OFLA pregnancy disability leave need not requalify under OAR 839-009-0210(6) for an additional 12 weeks of leave within the same leave year for any OFLA leave purpose.

(c) An employee who has taken 12 weeks of OFLA parental leave, need not requalify under OAR 839-009-0210(6) for up to an additional 12 weeks of leave within the same leave year when used for the purposes of OFLA sick child leave.

(12) An exempt employee is a salaried executive, administrative or professional employee under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (see 29 CFR Part 541 through 541.315) or the state minimum wage and overtime laws (ORS chapters 652 and 653).

(a) When OFLA leave is also covered by FMLA and the employee takes intermittent leave in blocks of less than one day, the employer may reduce the employee's salary for the part-day absence without the loss of the employee's exempt status in accordance with OAR 839-020-0004(30)(a).

(b) When OFLA leave is not covered by FMLA (e.g., the employer has 25 to 49 employees, the leave is taken for a sick child, for the serious health condition of a parent-in-law, for the serious health condition of a registered domestic partner or for the serious health condition of a registered domestic partner's parents), and the employee takes intermittent leave in blocks of less than one day, an employer will jeopardize the employee's exempt status if the employer reduces the employee's salary for the part-day absence.

(13) The requirements of OFLA do not apply to any employer offering eligible employees a nondiscriminatory cafeteria plan, as defined by section 125 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, that provides as one of its options employee leave at least as generous as the leave required by OFLA.

839-009-0245 Intermittent Leave and Alternate Duty

(1) An employer may transfer an employee on intermittent OFLA leave or a reduced work schedule into an alternate position with the same or different duties to accommodate the leave, provided the following exist:

(a) The employee accepts the transfer position voluntarily and without coercion;

(b) The transfer is temporary, lasts no longer than necessary to accommodate the leave and has equivalent pay and benefits;

(c) The transfer is compliant with applicable collective bargaining agreements, as well as with state and federal law, providing all the employee protections found in FMLA regulations 29 CFR Part 825;

(d) Transfer to an alternate position is used only when there is no other reasonable option available that would allow the employee to use intermittent leave or reduced work schedule; and

(e) The transfer is not used to discourage the employee from taking intermittent or reduced work schedule leave, or to create a hardship for the employee.

(2) An employee transferred, as provided in section (1)(a) through (e) of this rule, to an alternate position for the purpose of a reduced work schedule must be returned to the employee's former position when the employee notifies the employer that the employee is ready to return to the former position at the end of the alternate duty leave.

(3) OFLA leave time for an employee on intermittent leave or a reduced work schedule is the difference between the number of hours the employee normally works and the number of hours the employee actually works during the intermittent leave or reduced work schedule. When it is physically impossible for an employee using intermittent leave or working a reduced leave schedule to commence or end work during a shift, such as when a flight attendant or a railroad conductor is scheduled to work aboard an airplane or train, or a laboratory employee is unable to enter or leave a sealed “clean room” during a certain period of time, the entire period of work from which the employee is forced to be absent is designated as OFLA leave and counts against the employee's OFLA entitlement.

(4) Holidays or days in which the employer's business is not in operation are not counted toward intermittent or reduced work schedule OFLA leave.

(5) An employer may transfer an employee recovering from a serious health condition to an alternate position that accommodates the serious health condition provided:

(a) The employee accepts the position voluntarily and without coercion;

(b) The transfer is temporary, lasts no longer than necessary and has equivalent pay and benefits;

(c) The transfer is compliant with applicable collective bargaining agreements, as well as with state and federal law, providing all the employee protections found in FMLA regulations 29 CFR Part 825; and

(d) The transfer is not used to discourage the employee from taking OFLA leave for a serious health condition, or to create a hardship for the employee.

(6) An employee is not on OFLA leave if the employee has been transferred — as provided in section (5)(a) through (d) of this rule — to an alternate position for the purpose of alternate work duties that the employee is able to perform within the limitations of the employee's own serious health condition, but not requiring a reduced work week. An employee working in an alternate position retains the right to return to the employee's original position unless all OFLA leave taken in that leave year plus the period of time worked in the alternate position exceed 12 weeks.

(7) An alternate position accommodating an employee's serious health condition may result in the employee working fewer hours than the employee worked in the original position. The employee's OFLA leave is the difference between the number of hours the employee worked in the original position and the number of hours the employee actually works in the alternate position.

(8) Intermittent leave for school teachers is subject to the special rules in OAR 839-009-0290.

839-009-0250 Notice by Employee; Designation by Employer; Notice by Employer Regarding Eligibility or Qualification

(1) Except in situations described in sections (2) and (3) of this rule, a covered employer may require an eligible employee to give 30 days written notice of the need for foreseeable leave, including an explanation of the need for leave, before starting OFLA leave. The employee is not required to specify that the request is for OFLA leave.

(a) An employee able to give advance notice of the need to take OFLA leave must follow the employer's known, reasonable and customary procedures for requesting any kind of leave, absent unusual circumstances.

(b) An employer may request additional information to determine that a requested leave qualifies for designation as OFLA leave, except in cases of parental leave (no medical verification required) or sick child leave (no medical verification may be required until after three occurrences).

(c) The employer may provisionally designate an absence as OFLA leave until sufficient information is received to make a determination. An employee who calls in sick without providing further information will not be considered to have provided sufficient notice to trigger an employer’s obligations under OFLA.

(d) An employee on OFLA leave who needs to take more leave than originally authorized must give the employer reasonable notice prior to the end of the authorized leave, following the employer's known, reasonable and customary procedures for requesting any kind of leave. However, when an authorized period of OFLA leave has ended and an employee does not return to work, an employer having reason to believe the continuing absence may qualify as OFLA leave must request additional information, and may not treat a continuing absence as unauthorized unless requested information is not provided or does not support OFLA qualification.

(2) When an employee is unable to give the employer 30 days notice but has some advance notice of the need for leave, the employee must give the employer as much advance notice as is practicable.

(3) When taking OFLA leave in an unforeseeable situation, an employee must give verbal or written notice within 24 hours before or after commencement of the leave. This notice may be given by any other person on behalf of an employee taking unanticipated OFLA leave. The employer may require written notice by the employee within three days of the employee's return to work.

(4) If an employee fails to give notice as required by sections (1), (2), and (3) of this rule or the employer's policies:

(a) The employer may reduce the period of unused OFLA leave by an amount no greater than the number of days of leave the employee has taken without providing timely notice of leave. This reduction of leave may not exceed three weeks in a one-year leave period (see ORS 659A.165(4)); and

(b) The employee may also be subject to disciplinary action under an employer's uniformly applied policy or practice. This practice must be consistent with the employer's discipline for similar violations of comparable rules.

(5) When an employee requests OFLA leave, or when the employer acquires knowledge that an employee's leave may be for an OFLA-qualifying reason, the employer must notify the employee within five business days whether the employee is eligible and qualifies to take OFLA leave absent extenuating circumstances. All OFLA absences for the same qualifying reason are considered a single leave event and employee qualification as to that reason for leave does not change during the applicable 12-month period unless the reason is no longer qualifying. If an employer determines that an employee does not qualify for OFLA leave for the reason requested, the employer must notify the employee in writing that the employee does not qualify.

(a) The written notice that the employee does not qualify must state that the employee is ineligible or the reason for requested leave does not qualify for OFLA leave and at least one reason why the employee is not eligible or the reason does not qualify for leave.

(b) If an employer determines that an employee does not qualify for OFLA leave for the reason requested because a medical verification is incomplete or insufficient, the written notice that the employee does not qualify must state what additional information is required to make the verification complete or sufficient, and the employee must be afforded a reasonable period of time to correct the deficiency.

(6) When an employee fails to respond to reasonable employer requests for medical verification of the employee’s requested reason for leave to determine whether the leave is OFLA qualifying, the employer may deny use of OFLA leave until medical verification is received.

(7) An employer may not reduce an employee's available OFLA leave or take disciplinary action unless the employer has posted the required Bureau of Labor and Industries Family Leave Act notice or the employer can otherwise establish that the employee had actual knowledge of the notice requirement.

(8) Federal regulations prohibit reducing the leave period under FMLA, but allow an employer to delay the start of leave because of improper notice (see 29 CFR Section 825.304).

(9) When an employee is subject to both FMLA and OFLA, the employer must apply the discipline available under (4)(a), (b) or (6) of this rule that is most beneficial to the employee's individual circumstances.

(10) An employee who refuses an offer of employment under ORS 659A.043(3)(a)(D) or 659A.046(3)(d) and who otherwise is entitled to OFLA leave under 659A.150 to 659A.186:

(a) Automatically commences a period of OFLA leave upon refusing the offer of employment; and

(b) Need not give notice to the employer that would otherwise be required by this rule that the employee is commencing a period of leave. See ORS 659A.162, OAR 839-006-0131(2) and 839-006-0136(4).

839-009-0260 Medical Verification and Scheduling of Treatment

(1) An employer may require an employee to provide medical verification of the need for OFLA leave, except that an employer may not require medical verification for parental leave. All requests for medical verification must be in writing and must state the consequences for failure to provide the requested medical verification.

(2) Consistent with ORS 659A.306, the employer must pay the cost of any medical verification not covered by insurance or another benefit plan.

(3) When an employer requires eligible employees to give advance written notice of a foreseeable need for leave and an eligible employee gives such notice, the employer may require the employee to provide medical verification of the need for OFLA leave before the leave starts.

(4) When an employee commences unforeseeable OFLA leave as defined in ORS 659A.165(2) without prior notice, the employee must provide medical verification within 15 days of the employer’s request for verification.

(5) If an employer determines that a medical verification provided by an employee is incomplete or insufficient, the employer must provide written notice that states the verification is incomplete or insufficient and the additional information needed to make it complete or sufficient.

(6) When an employee fails to respond to reasonable employer requests for medical verification of the employee’s eligibility for foreseeable leave to determine whether the leave is OFLA qualifying, the employer may deny use of OFLA leave until complete or sufficient medical verification is received.

(7) An employer may not delay the use of OFLA leave when medical verification is not received before the commencement of unforeseeable leave. The employer may designate the leave as provisionally approved, subject to medical verification.

(8) If an employee submits medical verification signed by a health care provider, the employer may not directly request additional information from the employee or family member’s health care provider. However, with permission from the employee or family member, a health care provider representing the employer may contact the employee or family member’s health care provider to clarify or authenticate the medical verification.

(9) An employer may not request subsequent medical verifications more often than every 30 days and then only in connection with the employee’s absence except when:

(a) Circumstances described by the previous medical verification have changed significantly (e.g., the duration or frequency of absences, the severity of conditions, or complications); or

(b) The employer receives information that casts doubt upon the employee’s stated reason for the absence.

(10) If an employee requests OFLA leave for any purpose except parental leave, the employer may require the employee to obtain the opinion of a second health care provider designated by the employer, at the employer’s expense. If the opinion of the second provider conflicts with the medical verification provided by the employee, the employer may require the two providers to designate a third health care provider to provide an opinion at the employer’s expense (see ORS 659A.168). The opinion of the third provider is binding on both the employer and the employee.

(11) Upon request by the employee, the employer is required to provide the employee with a copy of any second and third medical opinions required under section 10 of this rule. Absent extenuating circumstances, the requested copies must be provided within five business days after the receipt of the employee’s request.

(12) When OFLA is taken for the employee’s serious health condition, the employer may require the employee to present verification from the employee’s health care provider that the employee is able to resume work before restoring the employee to work. The employer may not require the employee to obtain a second opinion about the employee’s ability to return to work after taking OFLA leave. (see OAR 839-009-0270(7)).

(13) If an employee has taken sick child leave on all or any part of three separate days during a leave year, the employer may require medical verification from a health care provider on the fourth day or subsequent occurrence of sick child leave within that leave year. The employer must pay the cost of the verification not covered by insurance or another benefit plan (see ORS 659A.306). The opinion of the health care provider is binding, and the employer may not require the employee to obtain a second opinion.

(14) When possible, an employee must make a reasonable effort to schedule medical treatment or supervision at times that will minimize disruption of the employer’s operation.

839-009-0265 Medical Verification in Languages Other than English

(1) In circumstances in which an employee or family member needs to obtain medical verification in a foreign country, the employer shall accept a medical verification as well as second and third opinions from a health care provider who practices in that country.

(2) When a medical verification by a health care provider is in a language other than English, the employer may request that the employee provide a written translation of the verification.

(a) The employee’s request for OFLA leave may not be denied on the basis of failure of a good faith effort to obtain translation of a medical verification.

(b) The employer may not deny the employee access to translation resources available to the employer (for instance, bilingual personnel or computer programs).

(c) The employer must request the translation as soon as is practicable upon learning that an employee’s circumstances may result in a medical verification being issued in a language other than English.

839-009-0270 Job Protection

(1) An employer must restore an employee returning from OFLA leave, including intermittent and alternative duty leave, to the employee's former position if the job still exists, even if it has been filled during the employee's OFLA leave. The former position is the position held by the employee at the time OFLA leave began, regardless of whether the job has been renamed or reclassified. (For example, a delivery driver must be returned to the same route, at the same rate of pay and benefits, driving the same truck, delivering the same goods, on the same shift and working from the same location as when the driver started OFLA leave.)

(2) Any worker hired during an eligible employee's leave to perform the same work that the eligible employee performed before the leave was taken is a replacement worker. When the eligible employee notifies the employer that the employee is ready to return to work, the employer must give that employee the opportunity to work any hours that the replacement worker would otherwise have been scheduled to work.

(3) The employee is not entitled to return to the former position if the employee would have been bumped if OFLA leave had not been taken.

(4) If the position held by the employee at the time OFLA leave began has in fact been eliminated and not merely renamed or reclassified, the employer must restore the employee to any available, equivalent position.

(a) An available position is a position that is vacant or not permanently filled.

(b) An equivalent position is a position that is the same as the former position in as many aspects as possible. If an equivalent position is not available at the employee's former job site, the employee may be restored to an equivalent position within 20 miles of the former job site.

(5) Unless the terms of a collective bargaining agreement, other agreement or the employer's policy provide otherwise:

(a) An employee on OFLA leave does not accrue seniority, production bonuses or other benefits that would accrue while the employee is working;

(b) An employee has no greater right to a job or other employment benefits than if the employee had not taken OFLA leave; and

(c) An employee is subject to layoff the same as similarly situated employees not taking OFLA leave.

(6) Except for benefits used while on OFLA leave, benefits an employee was entitled to prior to starting OFLA leave must be restored in full upon the employee's return to work. (For example, an employer's medical insurance requires a three-month waiting period for health insurance coverage. An employee works seven months, takes OFLA leave for 12 weeks and returns to work with health problems. The employee must be covered immediately at the same level of coverage, with the same benefits as before the commencement of the OFLA leave.) The benefits do not have to be restored, however, if such benefits have been eliminated or changed for similarly situated employees. This applies to all benefit provisions.

(a) An employer electing to continue health or other insurance coverage for an employee on OFLA leave may require that the employee pay only the same share of health or other insurance premium during the leave that the employee paid prior to the leave.

(b) If an employee cannot or will not pay such costs, the employer may elect to discontinue benefit coverage, unless to do so would render the employer unable to restore the employee to full benefit coverage as required in section (6) of this rule.

(c) If an employer pays any portion of any employee's benefit coverage for employees on non-OFLA leave, the employer must pay that portion during OFLA leave.

(d) If the employer pays (directly or indirectly, voluntarily or as required by state or federal statute) any part of the employee's share of health or other insurance premium while an employee is on OFLA leave, the employer may deduct up to 10 percent of the employee's gross pay each pay period after the employee returns to work until the amount is repaid.

(e) If an employee fails to return to work — unless the failure to return to work is because of a serious health condition for which the employee would be entitled to OFLA leave or another circumstance beyond the employee's control — the employer may recover the employee's share of benefits paid by the employer. The employer may use any legal means to collect the amount owed for the employee's share of benefits paid by the employer, including deducting the amount from the employee's final paycheck.

(7) An employer may require an employee to follow the employer's established leave policy regarding periodic reporting to the employer of the employee's current status. Before restoring the employee to work after taking OFLA leave for the employee's own serious health condition, the employer may require the employee to present verification from the employee's health care provider that the employee is able to resume work, provided such requirement is applied pursuant to a uniformly applied practice or policy of the employer.

(a) Pursuant to ORS 659A.168(1), the employer is responsible for any co-pay or other out-of-pocket costs incurred by the employee in providing the verification.

(b) The employer may not require the employee to obtain a second opinion.

(8) If an employee gives unequivocal notice of intent not to return to work from OFLA leave:

(a) The employee is entitled to complete the approved OFLA leave, providing that the original need for OFLA leave still exists. The employee remains entitled to all the rights and protections under OFLA, including but not limited to, the use of vacation, sick leave and health benefits pursuant to OAR 839-009-0270 and 839-009-0280, except that:

(A) The employer's obligations under OFLA to restore the employee's position and to restore benefits upon the completion of leave cease, except as required by federal COBRA law, 29 USC 1161 et seq.; and

(B) The employer is not required to hold a position vacant or available for the employee who gives unequivocal notice of intent not to return.

(9) An employer may not use the provisions of this section as a subterfuge to avoid the employer's responsibilities under OFLA.

839-009-0280 Use of Paid Leave

(1) Except as provided in this rule or the terms of a collective bargaining agreement, an agreement between the eligible employee and the covered employer, or an employer policy, OFLA leave is not required to be granted with pay.

(2) An employee eligible to take OFLA leave is entitled to use accrued paid sick leave, personal leave, vacation leave or any other paid leave that is offered in lieu of vacation leave, during the period of OFLA leave. As used in this rule, accrued paid sick leave does not include disability insurance or disability benefits.

(3) An employer may require an employee to use available paid leave during OFLA leave that would otherwise be unpaid, and may determine the order in which paid leave is to be used if to do so is consistent with a collective bargaining agreement or other written agreement between the eligible employee and the covered employer or an employer policy. The employer may exercise these prerogatives only if:

(a) Prior to the commencement of OFLA leave, the employer provides written notice to the employee that accrued paid leave is to be used during OFLA leave; or

(b) Within two business days of the employee's notice of unanticipated or emergency leave, the employer provides written notice to the employee.

(4) An eligible employee or covered employer may choose to have the employee's OFLA leave run concurrently with a type of paid or unpaid leave not referenced in these rules, as provided or allowed under an employer policy, except that an employer may not reduce the amount of OFLA leave available to an eligible employee by any period the employee is unable to work because of a disabling compensable injury, as defined in ORS 656.005 (see ORS 659A.162(6)).

839-009-0290 Special Rules for Public School Teachers

(1) The provisions of this section apply only to employees of a school district, employed principally as instructors in public kindergartens, elementary schools, secondary schools or education service districts.

(2) If a public school teacher requests foreseeable OFLA leave for a serious health condition of the employee or the employee’s family member, and the teacher will be absent more than 20 percent of the total number of working days in the period during which the leave would occur, the employer may require the teacher to elect one of the following options:

(a) To take OFLA leave for one uninterrupted period of time to complete medical treatment. (School holidays and school vacation days are not counted as OFLA leave); or

(b) To transfer temporarily into an available alternative position that better accommodates periodic absences.

(3) If a teacher begins OFLA leave more than five weeks before the end of the academic term because of the teacher's own serious health condition, the employer may require the teacher to remain on leave until the end of the term if:

(a) The OFLA leave is at least three weeks long; and

(b) The teacher's return to work would occur within three weeks of the end of the term.

(4) If a teacher begins OFLA leave within five weeks of the end of the academic term for parental leave or the serious health condition of a family member, the employer may require the teacher to remain on OFLA leave through the end of the term if:

(a) The leave is at least two weeks long; and

(b) The teacher's return would occur within the last two weeks of the term.

(5) If a teacher begins OFLA leave within three weeks of the end of the academic term for parental leave or to care for a family member with a serious health condition and the leave is greater than five working days, the employer may require the teacher to remain on family leave until the end of the term.

(6) If a teacher takes OFLA leave to the end of the school year and continues the leave at the beginning of the next school term, the leave is consecutive rather than intermittent leave.

(a) The period between the end of the school term and the beginning of the next school term, when a teacher would not have been required to report for duty, is not counted against the teacher's OFLA leave entitlement.

(b) A teacher on OFLA leave at the end of the school term must be provided with the same benefits during the period between school terms that the teacher would normally receive if no OFLA leave were taken.

(7) If a teacher is required by the employer to remain on leave to the end of the academic term, only the period of leave the teacher requested can be charged against the teacher's OFLA leave entitlement.

(8) Nothing in these rules prohibits the employer from allowing the teacher to work as a substitute or in some other paid capacity during the weeks prior to the end of term under subsection (4) or (5) of this rule.

(9) Full-time employees covered by this rule, and who have been maintained on the payroll by a school district during 180 consecutive calendar days, are thereafter deemed to have been employed by that school district for an average of at least 25 hours per week during the 180 days immediately preceding the date any OFLA leave begins.

839-009-0300 Postings

(1) Each covered employer must display the Bureau of Labor and Industries Family Leave Act notice. The notice must be displayed in each building or worksite in an area that is accessible to and regularly frequented by employees. Failure to post the Family Leave Act notice is an unlawful employment practice as provided in ORS 659A.001(12).

(2) Electronic posting of the Family Leave Act notice is not sufficient to satisfy posting requirements, but may supplement worksite posting.

839-009-0320 Enforcement and Retaliation

(1) An employer's duties and obligations under OFLA extend to a successor employer as defined in 29 CFR 825.107.

(2) In accordance with the provisions of OFLA an eligible employee claiming a violation of the OFLA may file a complaint with the Civil Rights Division of the Bureau of Labor and Industries in the manner provided by ORS 659A.820.

(3) It is an unlawful employment practice for an employer to retaliate or in any way discriminate against any person with respect to hiring, tenure or any other term or condition of employment because the person has inquired about OFLA leave, submitted a request for OFLA leave or invoked any provision of the Oregon Family Leave Act.

(4) Pursuant to ORS 659A.030(1)(f), it is an unlawful employment practice for an employer to discharge, expel or otherwise discriminate against any person because the person has filed a complaint, testified or assisted in any proceeding in connection with the Oregon Family Leave Act.

(5) Pursuant to ORS 659A.030(1)(g), it is an unlawful employment practice for any person, whether an employer or an employee, to aid, abet, incite, compel or coerce the doing of any of the acts in violation of the Oregon Family Leave Act or to attempt to do so.

School Visitation

329.125 Policy on parental and community participation.

The Legislative Assembly recognizes that students in public elementary and secondary schools can best reach the levels of performance expected under the provisions of this chapter with parental and community participation in the education process. It is, therefore, recommended but not required that:

(1) School districts provide opportunities for parents or guardians to be involved in establishing and implementing educational goals and to participate in decision-making at the school site;

(2) Employers recognize the need for parents or guardians and members of the community to participate in the education process not only for their own children but for the educational system;

(3) Employers be encouraged to extend appropriate leave to parents or guardians to allow greater participation in that process during school hours;

(4) School districts enter into partnerships with business, labor and other groups to provide workplace-based professional development opportunities for their educational staff; and

(5) School districts enter into partnerships with recreation groups, faith-based organizations, social service and health care agencies, businesses, child care providers and other groups that support children and families to create community learning centers for students, parents and members of the surrounding community.

659A.150 Terms defined.

As used in ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186:
(1) "Covered employers" means an employer as described in section ORS 659A.153.
(2) "Eligible employee" means any employee of a covered employer other than those employees exempted under the provisions of ORS 659A.153.
(3) "Family leave" means a leave of absence described in ORS 659A.159, except that "family leave" does not include leave taken by an eligible employee who is unable to work because of a disabling compensable injury, as defined in ORS 656.005, under ORS chapter 656 .
(4) "Family member" means the spouse of an employee, the biological, adoptive or foster parent or child of the employee, the grandparent or grandchild of the employee, a parent-in-law of the employee or a person with whom the employee was ore is in a relationship of in loco parentis.
(5) "Health care provider" means;
(a) A person who is primarily responsible for providing health care to an eligible employee or a family member of an eligible employee, who is performing within the scope of the person's professional license or certificate and who is:
(A) A physician licensed to practice medicine under ORS 677.110, including a doctor of osteopathy;
(B) A podiatrist licensed under ORS 677.825;
(C) A dentist licensed under ORS 679.090;
(D) A psychologist licesned under ORS 675.030;
(E) An optometrist lincesed under ORS 686.070;
(F) A naturopath licensed under ORS 685.080;
(G) A registered nurse licensed under ORS 678.050;
(H) A nurse practitioner certified under ORS 678.375;
(I) A direct entry midwife licensed under ORS 687.420;
(J) A licensed registered nurse who is certified by the Oregon State Board of Nursing as a nurse midwife nurse practitioner;
(K) A clinical social worker licensed under ORS 675.530; or
(L) A chiropractic physician licensed under ORS 684.054, but only to the extent the chiropractic physician provides treatment consisting of manual manipulation of the spine to correct a subluxation demonstrated to exist by X-rays.
(b) A person who is primarily responsible for the treatment of an eligible employee or a family member of an eligible employee solely through spiritual means, including but not limited to a Christian Science practitioner.
(6) "Serious health condition" means:
(a) An illness, injury, impairment or physical or mental condition that requires inpatient care in a hospital, hospice or residential medical care facility; (b) An illness, disease or condition that in the medical judgment of the treating health care provider poses an imminent danger of death, is terminal in prognosis with a reasonable possibility of death in the near future, or requires constant care; or (c) Any period of disability due to pregnancy, or period of absence for prenatal care.

659A.153 Covered employers.

(1) The requirements of ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186 apply only to employers who employ 25 or more persons in the State of Oregon for each working day during each of 20 or more calendar workweeks in the year in which the leave is to be taken or in the year immediately preceding the year in which the leave is to be taken.
(2) The requirements of ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186 do not apply to any employer who offers to an eligible employee a nondiscriminatory cafeteria plan, as defined by section 125 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, providing, as one of its options, employee leave at least as generous as the leave required by ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186. [Formerly 659.472]

659A.156 Eligible employees; exceptions

(1) All employees of a covered employer are eligible to take leave for one of the purposes specified in ORS 659A.159 (1)(b) to (d) except:
(a) An employee who was employed by the covered employer for fewer than 180 days immediately before the date on which the family leave would commence.
(b) An employee who worked an average of fewer than 25 hours per week for the covered employer during the 180 days immediately preceding the date on which the family leave would commence.
(2) All employees of a covered employer are eligible to take leave for the purpose specified in ORS 659A.159 (1)(a) except an employee who was employed by the covered employer for fewer than 180 days immediately before the date on which the family leave would commence.

659A.159 Purposes for which family leave may be taken.

(1) Family leave under ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186 may be taken by an eligible employee for any of the following purposes:
(a) To care for an infant or newly adopted child under 18 years of age, or for a newly placed foster child under 18 years of age, or for an adopted or foster child older than 18 years of age if the child is incapable of self-care because of a mental or physical disability.
(b) To care for a family member with a serious health condition.
(c) To recover from or seek treatment for a serious health condition of the employee that renders the employee unable to perform at least one of the essential functions of the employee’s regular position.
(d) To care for a child of the employee who is suffering from an illness, injury or condition that is not a serious health condition but that requires home care.
(2) Leave under subsection (1)(a) of this section must be completed within 12 months after birth or placement of the child, and an eligible employee is not entitled to any period of family leave under subsection (1)(a) of this section after the expiration of 12 months after birth or placement of the child. [Formerly 659.476]
659A.162 Length of leave; conditions; rules. (1) Except as specifically provided by ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186, an eligible employee is entitled to up to 12 weeks of family leave within any one-year period.
(2)
(a) In addition to the 12 weeks of leave authorized by subsection (1) of this section, an eligible female employee may take a total of 12 weeks of leave within any one-year period for an illness, injury or condition related to pregnancy or childbirth that disables the eligible employee from performing any available job duties offered by the employer.
(b) An eligible employee who takes 12 weeks of family leave within a one-year period for the purpose specified in ORS 659A.159 (1)(a) may take up to an additional 12 weeks of leave within the one-year period for the purpose specified in ORS 659A.159 (1)(d).
(3) When two family members work for the same covered employer, the eligible employees may not take concurrent family leave unless:
(a) One employee needs to care for the other employee who is suffering from a serious health condition; or
(b) One employee needs to care for a child who has a serious health condition while the other employee is also suffering a serious health condition.
(4) An eligible employee may take family leave for the purposes specified in ORS 659A.159 (1)(a) in two or more nonconsecutive periods of leave only with the approval of the employer.
(5) Leave need not be provided to an eligible employee by a covered employer for the purpose specified in ORS 659A.159 (1)(d) if another family member is available to care for the child.
(6) A covered employer may not reduce the amount of family leave available to an eligible employee under this section by any period the employee is unable to work because of a disabling compensable injury.

(7) The Commissioner of the Bureau of Labor and Industries shall adopt rules governing when family leave for a serious health condition of an eligible employee or a family member of the eligible employee may be taken intermittently or by working a reduced workweek. Rules adopted by the commissioner under this subsection shall allow taking of family leave on an intermittent basis or by use of a reduced workweek to the extent permitted by federal law and to the extent that taking family leave on an intermittent basis or by use of a reduced workweek will not result in the loss of an eligible employee’s exempt status under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act.

659A.165 Notice to employer.

(1) Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, a covered employer may require an eligible employee to give the employer written notice at least 30 days before commencing family leave. The employer may require the employee to include an explanation of the need for the leave in the notice.
(2) An eligible employee may commence taking family leave without prior notice under the following circumstances:
(a) An unexpected serious health condition of an employee or family member of an employee;
(b) An unexpected illness, injury or condition of a child of the employee that requires home care; or
(c) A premature birth, unexpected adoption or unexpected foster placement.
(3) If an employee commences leave without prior notice under subsection (2) of this section, the employee must give oral notice to the employer within 24 hours of the commencement of the leave, and must provide the written notice required by subsection (1) of this section within three days after the employee returns to work. The oral notice required by this subsection may be given by any other person on behalf of the employee taking the leave.
(4) If the employee fails to give notice as required by subsections (1) and (3) of this section, the employer may reduce the period of family leave required by ORS 659A.162 by three weeks, and the employee may be subject to disciplinary action under a uniformly applied policy or practice of the employer.

659A.168 Medical verification and scheduling of treatment.

(1) Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, a covered employer may require medical verification from a health care provider of the need for the leave if the leave is for a purpose described in ORS 659A.159 (1)(b) to (d). If an employee is required to give notice under ORS 659A.165 (1), the employer may require that medical verification be provided by the employee before the leave period commences. If the employee commences family leave without prior notice pursuant to ORS 659A.165 (2), the medical verification must be provided by the employee within 15 days after the employer requests the medical verification. The employer may require an employee to obtain the opinion of a second health care provider designated by the employer, at the employer’s expense. If the opinion of the second health care provider conflicts with the medical verification provided by the employee, the employer may require the two health care providers to designate a third health care provider to provide an opinion at the employer’s expense. The opinion of the third health care provider shall be final and binding on the employer and employee. In addition to the medical verifications provided for in this subsection, an employer may require subsequent medical verification on a reasonable basis.
(2) A covered employer may require medical verification for leave taken for the purpose described in ORS 659A.159 (1)(d) only after an employee has taken more than three days of leave under ORS 659A.159 (1)(d) during any one-year period. Any medical verification required under this subsection must be paid for by the covered employer. An employer may not require an employee to obtain the opinion of a second health care provider for the purpose of medical verification required under this subsection.
(3) Subject to the approval of the health care provider, the employee taking family leave for a serious health condition of the employee or a family member of the employee shall make a reasonable effort to schedule medical treatment or supervision at times that will minimize disruption of the employer’s operations.

659A.171 Job protection; benefits.

(1) After returning to work after taking family leave under the provisions of ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186, an eligible employee is entitled to be restored to the position of employment held by the employee when the leave commenced if that position still exists, without regard to whether the employer filled the position with a replacement worker during the period of family leave. If the position held by the employee at the time family leave commenced no longer exists, the employee is entitled to be restored to any available equivalent position with equivalent employment benefits, pay and other terms and conditions of employment. If an equivalent position is not available at the job site of the employee’s former position, the employee may be offered an equivalent position at a job site located within 20 miles of the job site of the employee’s former position.
(2) Except for employee benefits used during the period of leave, the taking of family leave under ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186 shall not result in the loss of any employment benefit accrued before the date on which the leave commenced.
(3) This section does not entitle any employee to:
(a) Any accrual of seniority or employment benefits during a period of family leave; or
(b) Any right, benefit or position of employment other than the rights, benefits and position that the employee would have been entitled to had the employee not taken the family leave.
(4)
(a) Before restoring an employee to a position under subsection (1) of this section, an employer may require that the employee receive certification from the employee’s health care provider that the employee is able to resume work. Certification under this subsection may only be required pursuant to a uniformly applied practice or policy of the employer.
(b) This subsection does not affect the ability of an employer to require an employee during a period of family leave to report periodically to the employer on the employee’s status and on the employee’s intention to return to work.
(5) Benefits are not required to continue to accrue during a family leave unless continuation or accrual is required under an agreement of the employer and the employee, a collective bargaining agreement or an employer policy. Notwithstanding ORS 652.610 (3), if the employer is required or elects to pay any part of the costs of providing health, disability, life or other insurance coverage for an employee during the period of family leave that should have been paid by the employee, the employer may deduct from the employee’s pay such amounts upon the employee’s return to work until the amount the employer advanced toward the payments is paid. In no event may the total amount deducted for insurance under the provisions of this subsection exceed 10 percent of the employee’s gross pay each pay period.
(6) Notwithstanding ORS 652.610 (3), if the employer pays any part of the costs of health, disability, life or other insurance coverage for an employee under the provisions of subsection (5) of this section, and the employee does not return to employment with the employer after taking family leave, the employer may deduct amounts paid by the employer from any amounts owed by the employer to the employee, or may seek to recover those amounts by any other legal means, unless the employee fails to return to work because of:
(a) A continuation, reoccurrence or onset of a serious health condition that would entitle the employee to leave for one of the purposes specified by ORS 659A.159 (1)(b) or (c); or
(b) Other circumstances beyond the control of the employee.

659A.174 Use of paid leave.

(1) Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, and unless otherwise provided by the terms of an agreement between the eligible employee and the covered employer, a collective bargaining agreement or an employer policy, family leave is not required to be granted with pay.
(2) An employee taking family leave is entitled to use any paid accrued sick leave or any paid accrued vacation leave during the period of family leave, or to use any other paid leave that is offered by the employer in lieu of vacation leave during the period of family leave.
(3) Subject to the terms of any agreement between the eligible employee and the covered employer or the terms of a collective bargaining agreement, the employer may determine the particular order in which accrued leave is to be used in circumstances in which more than one type of accrued leave is available to the employee.

659A.177 Special rules for teachers.

(1) Notwithstanding any other provision of ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186, if a teacher requests leave for one of the purposes specified in ORS 659A.159 (1)(b) or (c), the need for the leave is foreseeable, and the employee will be on leave for more than 20 percent of the total number of working days in the period during which the leave would extend, the employer of the teacher may require that the employee elect one of the two following options:
(a) The employee may elect to take leave for a period or periods of a particular duration, not to exceed the duration of the anticipated medical treatment; or
(b) The employee may elect to transfer temporarily to an available alternative position that better accommodates recurring periods of leave than the regular position of the employee. The teacher must be qualified for the alternative position, and the position must have pay and benefits that are equivalent to the pay and benefits of the employee’s regular position.
(2) Notwithstanding any other provision of ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186, if a teacher commences a period of family leave for the purpose specified in ORS 659A.159 (1)(c) more than five weeks before the end of an academic term, the employer of the teacher may require that the employee continue on family leave until the end of the term if:
(a) The leave is of at least three weeks’ duration; and
(b) The employee’s return to employment would occur during the three-week period before the end of the term.
(3) Notwithstanding any other provision of ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186, if a teacher commences a period of family leave for one of the purposes specified in ORS 659A.159 (1)(a) or (b) during the five weeks before the end of an academic term, the employer of the teacher may require that the employee continue on family leave until the end of the term if:
(a) The leave is of at least two weeks’ duration; and
(b) The employee’s return to employment would occur during the two-week period before the end of the term.
(4) Notwithstanding any other provision of ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186, if a teacher commences a period of family leave for one of the purposes specified in ORS 659A.159 (1)(a) or (b) during the three-week period before the end of the term, and the duration of the leave is greater than five working days, the employer of the teacher may require that the employee continue on family leave until the end of the term.
(5) The provisions of this section apply only to an employee who is employed principally in an instructional capacity by a public kindergarten, elementary school, secondary school or education service district.

659A.180 Postings by employer.

A covered employer shall post a notice of the requirements of ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186 in every establishment of the employer in which employees are employed. The Bureau of Labor and Industries shall provide notices to covered employers meeting the requirements of this section.

659A.183 Denying family leave to eligible employee prohibited; retaliation prohibited

It is an unlawful practice for a covered employer to:
(1) Deny family leave to which an eligible employee is entitled under ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186; or
(2) Retaliate or in any way discriminate against an individual with respect to hire or tenure or any other term or condition of employment because the individual has inquired about the provisions of ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186, submitted a request for family leave or invoked any provision of ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186.

659A.186 Exclusivity of provisions; construction.

(1) ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186 do not limit any right of an employee to family medical leave to which the employee may be entitled under any agreement between the employer and the employee, collective bargaining agreement or employer policy.
(2) ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186 shall be construed to the extent possible in a manner that is consistent with any similar provisions of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993. Family leave taken under ORS 659A.150 to 659A.186 must be taken concurrently with any leave taken under the federal Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993.

Bone Marrow Donation

659A.312 Leave of absence to donate bone marrow; verification by employer.

(1) It is an unlawful employment practice for an employer to deny to grant already accrued paid leaves of absence to an employee who seeks to undergo a medical procedure to donate bone marrow. The total length of the leaves shall be determined by the employee, but shall not exceed the amount of already accrued paid leave or 40 work hours, whichever is less, unless agreed to by the employer.

(2) The employer may require verification by a physician of the purpose and length of each leave requested by the employee to donate bone marrow. If there is a medical determination that the employee does not qualify as a bone marrow donor, the paid leave of absence used by the employee prior to that medical determination is not affected.

(3) An employer shall not retaliate against an employee for requesting or using accrued paid leave of absence as provided by this section.

(4) This section does not:

(a) Prevent an employer from providing leave for bone marrow donations in addition to leave required under this section.

(b) Affect an employee’s rights with respect to any other employment benefit.

(5) This section applies only to employees who work an average of 20 or more hours per week.

[Formerly 659.358]

Breastfeeding

109.001.

A woman may breast-feed her child in a public place.

Sections 2 to 5 of this 2009 Act may be cited as the Oregon Military Family Leave Act.

SECTION 3. As used in sections 2 to 5 of this 2009 Act:

(1) Notwithstanding ORS 659A.001, 'employee' means an individual who performs services for compensation for an employer for an average of at least 20 hours per week. 'Employee ' includes all individuals employed at any site owned or operated by an employer, but does not include independent contractors.

(2) Notwithstanding ORS 659A.001, 'employer' means:

(a) A person, firm, corporation, partnership, legal representative or other business entity that engages in any business, industry, profession or activity in this state and that employs 25 or more persons in the State of Oregon for each working day during each of 20 or more calendar workweeks in the year in which leave is taken under section 4 of this 2009 Act or the year immediately preceding the year in which the leave is to be taken;

(b) The state, and a department, agency, board or commission of the state; and

(c) A local government, including, but not limited to, a county, city, town, municipal corporation, independent public corporation or political subdivision of the state.

(3) 'Period of military conflict' means a period of war:

(a) Declared by the United States Congress;

(b) Declared by executive order of the President of the United States; or

(c) In which a reserve component of the Armed Forces of the United States is ordered to active duty pursuant to the United States Code or section 12301 or 12302 of Title 10 of the United States Code.

(a) Declared by the United States Congress;

SECTION 4.

(1) During a period of military conflict, an employee who is a spouse of a member of the Armed Forces of the United States, the National Guard or the military reserve forces of the United States who has been notified of an impending call or order to active duty or who has been deployed is entitled to a total of 14 days of unpaid leave per deployment after the military spouse has been notified of an impending call or order to active duty and before deployment and when the military spouse is on leave from deployment.

(2) An employee who takes leave authorized under this section is entitled to be restored to a position of employment and to the continuation of benefits as provided in ORS 659A.171.

(3) An employee who intends to take leave as authorized under this section must provide the employer with notice of the intention to take leave within five business days of receiving official notice of an impending call or order to active duty or of a leave from deployment.

(4) An employee who takes leave authorized under this section may elect to substitute any accrued leave to which the employee is entitled for any part of the leave provided under this section.

(5) Leave taken under this section shall be included in the total amount of leave authorized under ORS 659A.162.

(6) The Bureau of Labor and Industries may adopt rules necessary for the implementation and administration of sections 2 to 5 of this 2009 Act.

SECTION 5. It is an unlawful practice for an employer to: (1) Deny military family leave to an employee who is entitled to such leave under sections 2 to 5 of this 2009 Act; or (2) Retaliate or in any way discriminate against an individual with respect to hire or tenure or any other term or condition of employment because the individual has inquired about the provisions of sections 2 to 5 of this 2009 Act, submitted a request for military family leave or invoked any provision of sections 2 to 5 of this 2009 Act.

SECTION 6. This 2009 Act being necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health and safety, an emergency is declared to exist, and this 2009 Act takes effect on its passage.

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